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  #1  
Old 09-02-18, 19:41
Joe-King Joe-King is offline
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Question How to use BCC?

I've been using computers for a long time, but I'm still a beginner in many respects. As just one example among many, I don't remember ever using BCC in e-mails.

I'm planning to use BCC to send the same message to a number of similar organisations, but do I need to put something in the "To" field, or can I leave it blank and only use BCC?
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  #2  
Old 09-02-18, 21:16
mikec1 mikec1 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

Put your own email address in the To box and you will get a blind copy yourself as will all the others.

If you leave it blank, it won't go anywhere!
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Old 09-02-18, 21:37
mikec1 mikec1 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

Sorry - you'll get a full copy yourself, of course. The others get blind copies.

You can also add yourself into the BCC list and you will get a blind copy as well as the full copy, so you will know what everyone you sent it to saw, as well as having a record of everyone you sent it to.

You can check it works just by sending a BCC email To yourself and BCC'ing just yourself.
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Old 10-02-18, 09:33
Joe-King Joe-King is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

Thanks mikec1. Such a simple thing, just that I've never had a reason to do it before. It wouldn't really matter if they all knew who else I'd sent it to, but I prefer BCC to CC for something like this.
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  #5  
Old 10-02-18, 10:36
pete.i pete.i is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

In e-mail terminology, Cc stands for "carbon copy" and Bcc stands for "Blind carbon copy". The difference between Cc and Bcc is that carbon copy (CC) recipients are visible to all other recipients whereas those who are BCCed are not visible to anyone.

Yeah I copied it from Mr Google but there you go.
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Old 10-02-18, 13:04
mikec1 mikec1 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

These terms originated when typists used typewriters to produce one original document. If you wanted to produce a copy for another person or the office files, you inserted a sheet of carbon paper behind the original and a sheet of thin copy paper behind that so that the typewriter key printed an impression on the original with the ink on a tape in front of it, and an impression on the copy paper with the smudgy black stuff on the carbon paper. That's why they were called Carbon Copies. A heavy handed typist could produce up to 7 legible copies in one go by adding sheets of carbon paper and copy paper behind the original.

If the typist wanted multiple addressees to know who had been copied in, a list of recipients would be typed on the original to produce the Carbon Copies.

If not, the carbon copies would be removed from the typewriter before the distribution list was added. These were then Blind Carbon Copies.

If you wanted more copies than could be typed with carbon paper, the typist had to "cut a stencil" by typing hard on to a film with a stiff backing. The keys cut through the film which was then used in a rotary machine as a stencil to produce multiple prints. Very messy.

It was a great relief when Xerox copiers were invented!
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Old 11-02-18, 17:49
rufford155 rufford155 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikec1 View Post
Put your own email address in the To box and you will get a blind copy yourself as will all the others.

If you leave it blank, it won't go anywhere!
That's not strictly true Mike.
I use BCC to forward joke emails to a group list and leave the 'To' blank.
This works with no problems.
I'm using Outlook 2016 in Windows 8.1
Maybe it's different for other email clients?
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  #8  
Old 11-02-18, 19:23
mikec1 mikec1 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

My WLM always needs the To box filling out. Doesn't seem to know which folder to put it in with multiple email addresses on the same client.

I keep intending to try Outlook as WLM doesn't take hotmail now so I have to use a poor W8.1 Mail app for that.
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Old 12-02-18, 06:14
rufford155 rufford155 is offline
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Default Re: How to use BCC?

I used to use WLM but started to have problems with it (some old threads on here) and then MS abandoned it.
I can't abide webmail so tried various desktop clients.
Finally decided to bite the bullet and take out a sub to Office 365.
At least that also keeps Word, Excel, etc up to date.
Unfortunately Outlook does have its own problems.
By the way, I am in Fylde too !
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