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Old 11-08-18, 03:52
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Question What do these denote in the hyperlink?

I'm currently watching some vintage TV via a VPN mirror website, and I noticed that many of the sublinks had an unusual URL after the https://, I'm guessing that it could be a hosting server but what do the WU members think?
The 2 most common are the "WWW" or just https:// but these new links are labelled / prefixed WW45. or a similar number.. Always 2 WW's and 2 numbers
Can anyone enlighten us why they are using this, is it a private safety thing?
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Old 11-08-18, 08:57
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Default Re: What do these denote in the hyperlink?

The host is using a bank of servers with several ww## addresses and you just happened to get the one numbered 45. You type in www.xxxx.com and the load balancer at the front end redirects you one of the ## numbered web servers behind it. Sites usually hide this fact and all their web servers show as www, but some either cannot be bothered or have it misconfgured.
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Old 11-08-18, 11:22
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Default Re: What do these denote in the hyperlink?

Thank you for clearing that puzzle up, Doubtless I will encounter many more on busy mirrors in the near future.
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Old 11-08-18, 20:01
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Default Re: What do these denote in the hyperlink?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bedstor View Post
Thank you for clearing that puzzle up, Doubtless I will encounter many more on busy mirrors in the near future.
I Think I have half pinned down what class these are called :
Quote:
Formula URL
Definition: A required structure that adheres to a specific format and must be used to connect to a destination.
Not much on this in Plain English Check the Last section on this article page
http://urlclearinghouse.wikidot.com/types

Quote:
Discussion: A formula URL may be either static or dynamic. If dynamic, the URL may be either unchanged or transformed at the destination, for example:...Unchanged at the destination


That explains why you often see an address on the Address bar but when you hover over the Hyperlink it shows a longer or made up differently version (at the foot of the window)>In fact, this pages hyperlinks do just that
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Old 12-08-18, 09:57
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Default Re: What do these denote in the hyperlink?

That link explains the use of urls to access files and directories on your server but your first question refers to the use of server names.
When you buy a domain, you can use anything you like as the server name. i.e. you own bob.mydomainname.com as well as ted.mydomainname.com
The “naked domain name”, i.e. your domain name without “www” – like “mydomainname” is called “the origin”. When the hostname begins with www you can type just the domain name e.g. 'www.mydomainname.com' goes to the same place as 'http://www.mydomainnanme.com' If the origin points to the same IP address as the www host then all visitors need to do is type "mydomainname" into their browser. That is why you can type "google" without the 'www' as a web address and still get to Google's website.

Back to your first question: Once you get to the domain you can then have one or more computers hosting that domain (or sub-domain). Each of these computers has a machine name and where there is only one the machine name of www is usually used. Where a machine name is left off of the front of the domain name the default machine name of www is usually assumed so that the person will still reach the right computer to access the site.

The number that follows the "www" i.e. ww45 indicates that the data being retrieved by the Web browser is coming from a different Web server than the one that serves the "www" address. Web sites, especially dynamic Web sites, that handle large amounts of traffic often need more than one server to accommodate the many requests they receive as one server often cannot handle the multitude of requests. The numbers that follow the "www?? refer to different Web servers, often as elements of a server farm, that all contain exactly the same information. The servers are used in coordination with each other for load balancing. Examples of this are Google, or Microsoft which use multiple servers to handle all their traffic.
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